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The Colombian Tale of Two Legal Revolutions

Santiago Garcia-Jaramillo & Daniel Currea-Moncada

1 Oct 2020

This Article focuses on a case study of Colombia’s judicial system by discussing the scope and competence of courts when facing legal revolutions. The term “revolution” is defined narrowly to mean the process of altering an existing constitutional system—either through constitutional amendments, or outside of such process—in order to achieve legal and social transformations. With this definition in mind, this Article aims to assess the role that Colombia’s courts play within said revolutions by evaluating two events in Colombian constitutional history: (1) the enactment of the 1991 Constitution; and (2) the implementation of the Peace Agreement with the Colombian Armed Revolutionary Forces (the FARC) after it was originally rejected in a plebiscite.

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Professor of Constitutional Law and Constitutional Interpretation at Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Colombia, and visiting research scholar at Cornell University (Spring of 2018 and 2019). LL. B Pontificia Universidad Javeriana —Colombia (2013) and specialization degree in Public Law at Universidad Externado de Colombia (2016). Email: garciajaramillosantiago@gmail.com.

LL. B Pontificia Universidad Javeriana—Colombia (2020). T.A. of Constitutional Law and Constitutional Interpretation at Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (Colombia). Email: dcurream@gmail.com.